PhD Council

About the Council

The PhD-council is the bridge between the PhD-students and the TRAIL-management. We act as an advisory board for the TRAIL-management regarding the TRAIL strategy, the course program and the TRAIL congress. Moreover, we organize PhD activities or social events every now and then for you to socialize or network with your peers.
If you have any questions, suggestions, ideas, problems or complaints, you can contact us by email or in person. And don’t forget to become a member of the TRAIL Members group on LinkedIn!

(in alphabetical order)

Valeria Caiati - chair

Valeria Caiati - chair

University representative of Eindhoven University of Technology

Research topic:
My PhD research aims at exploring the demand for innovative demand-driven mobility services based on platform technology. An example of these new services is the concept of Mobility as Service (MaaS). The assessment and prediction of consumers demand for MaaS require to take into account its core characteristics (e.g. integration of transport modes, integration of transport-related services and the presence of a single digital platform) together with the associated issues (e.g. uncertainty, social influence, network effects). Specifically the objective of my study is to develop a comprehensive modelling approach able to investigate the individual decision regarding subscription to a MaaS platform and the consequent purchase of mobility packages of services (adoption process). It also aim to provide insights about the dynamics affecting the diffusion of MaaS throughout the society.

Background and interests:
Education in Environmental Engineering (BSc and MSc), with a specialization on environmental sustainability issues. Professional experience in international consultancy firm and research institutes with a focus on smart cities, sustainable urban mobility and the role of ICTs in sustainable development. Interests include innovation adoption in transportation, transportation demand modelling and decision making processes.

Lizet Krabbenborg

Lizet Krabbenborg

University representative of Delft University of Technology

Research Topic:
Stakeholders’ acceptability of smart road pricing instruments’. In order to design and implement road pricing measures that can effectively manage congestion and are accepted by the public and politicians, it is important to have insights in the acceptability of these instruments. Because of the longstanding problems concerning feasibility of traditional road pricing instruments, recently the interest has increased for the development of road pricing instruments that are based on rewarding or trading (instead of charging). The aim is to gain insights in the acceptability of the public and politicians of these novel road pricing concepts.

Background and interests:
Bachelor in Architecture. Master in Transport, Infrastructure and Logistics (with a specialization in Policy). Both at the Delft University of Technology. Interest include cycling, politics and the combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods.

Pablo Nunez Velasco

Pablo Nunez Velasco

University representative of Delft University of Technology

Research Topic:
My PhD research focuses on the interactions between vulnerable road users (pedestrians and cyclists) and automated vehicles and their implications for urban road design and traffic safety. Obtaining a successful interaction in such a mixed traffic environment requires that all road users understand each other and that they behave in an expected way. To realize this, a system-approach is needed where knowledge and theories from social-psychological and behavioural sciences should be integrated with knowledge on traffic safety, urban design, and vehicle automation in the traffic environment. The main goal is to unravel and understand the complex and diverse interactions between different road users and automated driving in a mixed traffic environment, and to evaluate the implications on safety.

Background and interests:
Bachelor in Psychology and master degree in Applied Cognitive Psychology at Leiden University. Interests include human factors, behavioural sciences, and traffic safety.

Camill Harter

Camill Harter

University representative of Erasmus University Rotterdam

Research topic:
In my PhD project I study complexity and emergent behaviour in port hinterland systems. Hinterland transport networks exhibit complexity due to growing transport volumes, infrastructural and capacity limitations, a scattered landscape of decision makers, and multiple heterogeneous transport modes. The aim of this research is to explain how emergent behaviour arises from distributed decision making in hinterland transportation, i.e. for a transportation system that today seems barely predictable or explicable, it should be able to derive behaviour patterns that describe how micro-level behaviour affects macro-level behaviour and vice versa. Furthermore, understanding emergent behaviour is crucial to understand network performance. With the knowledge about how emergent behaviour reacts to individual behaviour, improvement potential of network performance can be identified.

Background and interest:
I studied Business Mathematics (B.Sc. and M.Sc.) at the university of Mannheim, Germany. My major academic interest lies in modelling and simulation of complex transportation networks. In my leisure time I enjoy being in nature for running, mountain biking, or orienteering.

Francesco Walker

Francesco Walker

University representative of University of Twente

Research topic:
Through my PhD I investigate human interactions with self-driving vehicles, with a main focus on trust in automation. The goal of Human Factors should not be to reach the highest possible level of trust in the user, but to align driver’s subjective feelings of safety with the actual capabilities of the vehicle. This is known as trust calibration. Although trust calibration is desirable, there is no consensus on how this should be measured and achieved. I study new objective ways of measuring driver’s trust, with the ultimate goal of calibrating user’s trust in a Highly Automated Vehicle.

Background and interests:
Bachelor in Marketing Psychology (Rome University La Sapienza) and Research Master in Cognitive Neuropsychology (VU Amsterdam – cum laude). My interests include human factors challenges in automated driving, cognitive psychology and art perception. In my free time I love playing football, volleyball and, on sunny days, riding my Suzuki GSXR 750.

Felix Pot

Felix Pot

University representative of University of Groningen

 

Research topic:
Rural areas are confronted with declining accessibility as a result of urbanisation and concentration forces. This could lead to constraints with respect to activity participation and social inclusion. However, the nature of the impacts of these higher needs for mobility in peripheral rural areas will depend on how accessibility is perceived. While some may experience major barriers with respect to reaching activities they desire and consequently with respect to inclusion in society, others may not experience any problems regarding accessibility depending on the ability to cope with declining accessibility and expectations regarding accessibility. My PhD project aims for an understanding of how perceptions of accessibility relate to activity and mobility patterns in peripheral rural areas in the Netherlands.

Background and interests:
I have a bachelor in Human Geography & Urban and Regional Planning and a master in Economic Geography, both from the University of Groningen. During my bachelor I obtained a high school teaching degree in Geography and I also studied at TU Delft for a while (master Transport, Infrastructure and Logistics), prior to my PhD. I have also worked as an electronic music producer, which I still like to do from time to time.

Nagarjun Reddy

Nagarjun Reddy

University representative of Delft University of Technology

Research topic:
There has been an increase in the deployment of automated vehicles on roads, and is expected to keep increasing in the coming years. A transition period will resultantly take place where automated vehicles will be driving on existing infrastructure alongside human-driven vehicles. Such mixed traffic conditions could result in possible new interactions between the human-driven and automated vehicles that could cause changes in the human drivers’ driving behaviour, known as Behavioural Adaptation. My PhD research aims to develop a behavioural and mathematical theory that would be able to explain the nature of these interactions between automated vehicles and human-driven vehicles, and to predict the factors that could affect human driver behavioural adaptation. Developing such a theory would be valuable to predict the effects that automated vehicles would have on human-driven vehicles, and also to estimate the effects on traffic safety and performance.

Background and interests:
Completed my Bachelors in Civil Engineering in Bengaluru, India. I then moved to the Netherlands and completed my Masters in Civil Engineering (Transport & Planning) at TU Delft. Started my PhD from Nov 2019. My interests include playing the Bansuri (Indian flute), Yoga, horse riding, badminton, and pool/snooker.

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